Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

General

NEIL GAIMAN’S AMERICAN GODS Is Headed To HBO

Deadline reports that HBO is possibly developing American Gods based on the novel by Neil Gaiman as a potential series.

The series will be developed by Playtone partners Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman and was brought to them by Oscar winning cinematographer Robert Richardson (Shutter Island, Inglourious Basterds and Kill Bill).  Richardson will script the pilot with Gaiman, creator of Sandman and Coraline.

Amazon’s Therese Littleton described the book on their site.

American Gods is Neil Gaiman’s best and most ambitious novel yet, a scary, strange, and hallucinogenic road-trip story wrapped around a deep examination of the American spirit. Gaiman tackles everything from the onslaught of the information age to the meaning of death, but he doesn’t sacrifice the razor-sharp plotting and narrative style he’s been delivering since his Sandman days.

Shadow gets out of prison early when his wife is killed in a car crash. At a loss, he takes up with a mysterious character called Wednesday, who is much more than he appears. In fact, Wednesday is an old god, once known as Odin the All-father, who is roaming America rounding up his forgotten fellows in preparation for an epic battle against the upstart deities of the Internet, credit cards, television, and all that is wired. Shadow agrees to help Wednesday, and they whirl through a psycho-spiritual storm that becomes all too real in its manifestations. For instance, Shadow’s dead wife Laura keeps showing up, and not just as a ghost–the difficulty of their continuing relationship is by turns grim and darkly funny, just like the rest of the book.

Armed only with some coin tricks and a sense of purpose, Shadow travels through, around, and underneath the visible surface of things, digging up all the powerful myths Americans brought with them in their journeys to this land as well as the ones that were already here. Shadow’s road story is the heart of the novel, and it’s here that Gaiman offers up the details that make this such a cinematic book–the distinctly American foods and diversions, the bizarre roadside attractions, the decrepit gods reduced to shell games and prostitution. “This is a bad land for Gods,” says Shadow.

More than a tourist in America, but not a native, Neil Gaiman offers an outside-in and inside-out perspective on the soul and spirituality of the country–our obsessions with money and power, our jumbled religious heritage and its societal outcomes, and the millennial decisions we face about what’s real and what’s not.

After the jump read the first five chapters of American Gods.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    April 21, 2011 at 6:51 am

    Neil Gaiman is underwriting Scientology. The Scientologist’s list Neil Gaiman in the Cornerstone Newsletter along with Mary Gaiman, as contributing $35,000.00 in 2009. Being listed in the Cornerstone Newsletter means you are in good-standing with the cult.

    In 2010, Mary Gaiman was awarded the "Gold Humanitarian Award" for her contribution of $500,000.00 to Scientology. This is significant because Mary Gaiman continues to be Neil Gaiman’s business partner in The Blank Corporation, which is now Neil Gaiman's Scientology front and how he pays the cult.

    Gaiman is also the "Vitamin Heir" of Scientology. The Gaiman family owns G&G Vitamins which reaps 6 million a year from selling The Purification Rundown Vitamins.

    Gaiman's two sisters, Claire Edwards and Lizzie Calciole are not just high-ranking Scientologists, they are the head of RECRUITING and the head of Wealden House, the Scientology stronghold in East Grinstead. These two cannot associate with Neil unless he is in good standing.

  2. Stefan Blitz

    Stefan Blitz

    April 21, 2011 at 8:32 am

    Neil Gaiman is Jewish, but his father was a prominent Scientologist in England, and has denied being currently active in the Church.

    At the same time, I'm not sure what this has to do with "American Gods".

  3. Anonymous

    June 9, 2011 at 7:59 am

    American Gods was awful! One of the worst books I've ever reviewed, boring and deeply dull.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You May Also Like

Movies

From the team behind the critically acclaimed Life After Flash (the Flash Gordon feature documentary celebrating the 1980 classic), Life After Atreyu will not...

Columns/Features

The latest Pixie Trix Comix Kickstarter (their 6th), from writer/artist Gisele Lagace (Archie Meets Ramones, Jem and the Holograms), with contributions from myself, Scott Duvall (Army...

Columns/Features

The Web Show is a place for all things movies, 80s, nostalgia, and film, featuring interviews with stars and crew from your favourite films,...

Books/Comics

Written by Phil Szostak Foreword by Doug Chiang Published by Abrams Books   It’s impossible to be a Star Wars fan and not love...